Roundup disrupts male reproductive functions

by triggering calcium-mediated cell death in rat testis and Sertoli cells.

This study was done on prepubertal rats exposed to Roundup. Roundup is the commercially available pesticide with the active ingredient Glyphosate. Roundup is used by thousands of home owners as a weed killer. Most people seem to be unaware of the dangers to their own health, the health of their children and pets.

In this study the young rats were exposed to low levels of Roundup for 30 minutes.

The result showed an increase in oxidative stress and cell death of Sertoli cells. Sertoli cells are cells of the testis and their function is to nourish the developing sperms.

Roundup increases calcium influx into cells by opening voltage-dependent calcium channels. Too much calcium in the intracellular fluid causes oxidative stress as well as necrotic cell death.

Oxidative stress is a condition when free radicals are being released. We all know about free radicals and the function of antioxidant to fight free radicals. Health conscious people like to eat foods that are high in antioxidants such as berries. Antioxidants reduce the damaging effects of free radicals on the cell.

Our body produces its own antioxidant, called Glutathione (GSH). This study on rats found that Roundup with the main ingredient Glyphosate reduces Glutathione levels. This is where other antioxidants come in, such as Vitamin C and E.

As shown in this study, antioxidants vitamin C and E can prevent the effect of calcium uptake into cells induced by Roundup. To make this clear, vitamin C and E reduces the effects of too much calcium inside cells they do not reduce incoming calcium.

Vitamin C and E also were tested in combination. Again, the results showed a prevention of the effects of calcium overload inside cells and necrotic cell death caused by Roundup.

But Glyphosate not only increases calcium inside cells, it also may act as an endocrine disruptor mainly in the male reproductive system.

This article explains that Glyphosate alters estrogen-regulated genes and testosterone levels.

Roundup causes the loss of fertility as the article describes it. When female rats are exposed to Roundup during pregnancy and lactation, their male offspring showed higher percentage of abnormal sperms and lower testosterone serum levels during puppetry.

The question I like to answer here is

What can we do to

  1. reduce Glyphosate levels in our body and
  2. reduce the oxidative stress caused by high calcium levels inside cells
  • One simple solution of course is to NOT purchase Roundup. I see the 1 gallon bottles in garden centers standing right next to the checkout. Why is that? It’s the section where people stand in line, when they have time thinking about items they forgot such as weed killer. Of course, they grab the item that is right in front of them, its convenient. Is it really?
  • We can educate our neighbors about the danger of Roundup, so they too can make an informed decision when it comes to their health. Hopefully, they too will not use any Roundup on their lawn. 
  • We can purchase organic fruits and vegetables
  • We can reduce the amount of Glyphosate that is in our drinking water by using a water filter that does exactly that. Berkey water filter remove Glyphosate to undetectable levels.
  • We also can add antioxidants to our diet by eating Berries (blueberries, blackberries, and cranberries), Oranges, artichokes, kidney beans, dark chocolate, bell peppers, kiwi, tomatoes, broccoli.
  • Food consumption of vitamin E can be increased by eating spinach, parsley, broccoli, cabbage, papaya, mango, kiwi, avocado, sunflower and sesame seeds, hazelnuts, and eggs.
  • Other options to increase vitamin C and E intake is the use of supplements such as

This article is intended for informational purposes only, please, consult your health care professional for their advice if you want to make changes to your health care routine.

 

Reference
Roundup disrupts male reproductive functions by triggering calcium-mediated
cell death in rat testis and Sertoli cells.


de Liz Oliveira Cavalli VL1, Cattani D1, Heinz Rieg CE1, Pierozan P2Zanatta L1,
Benedetti Parisotto E3, Wilhelm Filho D3, Mena Barreto Silva FR1,
Pessoa-Pureur R2, Zamoner A4.